5 Ways Online Students Can Network

OMC Admin

A third of all students are now enrolled in at least one online course, demonstrating the rising popularity of online education. Given the many advantages of online learning, such as flexibility and affordability, it is simple to comprehend why prospective students find distance learning so alluring.

 

While online students enjoy many of the same advantages as their on-campus peers, some students worry that networking in a virtual environment will be more challenging, if not impossible. Given how vital networking is to career success, students have every reason to be concerned because studies show that professional connections account for 85% of job placements. Thankfully, networking is feasible for online students. Distance learners can expand their professional networks even without the in-person interactions that take place in conventional classroom settings by adopting a different strategy.

 

Why should you network in grad school?

In graduate school, networking is crucial for both online and traditional students. You will be surrounded by classmates, teachers, and alums who have similar interests to your own while also possessing knowledge, contacts, and experience that will probably complement your own while you are a student. Developing an extensive network of business contacts early in your career can be very beneficial as you move through the workforce. While many jobs in today’s workforce are filled due to professional connections, frequently interacting with people in your field or related fields can inspire new ideas and benefit you from others’ experiences.

 

Even though there are typically fewer opportunities for in-person interactions in online courses, it is still possible to establish significant and lasting relationships in a virtual learning environment. Here are five practical methods to help you grow your network while taking online courses:

 

  1. Be the first

In an online course, networking can be initiated similarly to traditional in-person classes by introducing yourself and making an effort to connect with others. Take the initiative to introduce yourself and include personal details that are still pertinent, such as your job title, industry, desired degree, and reasons why you want to take the course. Don’t be afraid to introduce yourself and talk about other personal details, like your hobbies or extracurricular activities, to help break the ice. You might discover that you and your classmates share common interests, allowing you to connect. Being the first to say hello is the first step in building relationships in an online course, just like in conventional classrooms.

 

  1. Stay active in class

By asking questions, offering assistance, and contributing ideas, actively participate in class discussions with your peers and the professors. You might be surprised at how quickly you begin to make friends and form enduring relationships. You’ll soon develop an online persona and share your knowledge and opinions. Your classmates will remember you if you consistently post insightful content, and they’ll be more likely to get in touch with you later in the semester. You can also participate in forums by regularly asking and answering questions to build relationships with fellow students. Start your own thread if you can’t find the answers to your questions in the current discussions.

 

  1. Meet people in person or online

Maintaining connections with professors and classmates online is a successful strategy. However, face-to-face conversation, whether in person or via video call, can occasionally spark new ideas and opportunities for teamwork. When possible, schedule meetings with your professors or other nearby students if you live close to the campus. Try contacting your classmates to see if they live nearby and then arrange to meet up with them for a quick coffee or a study session. Meeting someone outside of the classroom might open doors you wouldn’t have otherwise, but virtual connections are just as valuable in the absence of in-person meetings.

 

Another way to build excellent connections is to look for local events where industry leaders will speak. You’ll probably run into like-minded people you can talk to about subjects related to your field of study. These in-person encounters with experts in your field will broaden your network and leave a more lasting impression.

 

  1. Create and maintain a strong online presence

Engaging with classmates on other websites is another way to establish connections while being apart. A robust online presence is essential for distance learners to build relationships with their instructors and classmates. Also, be sure to present yourself in the best and most professional way possible, just as you would in person.

 

Create social media accounts or a LinkedIn account if you don’t already have one, and make sure your profiles are accurate, current, and comprehensive. Keep them updated with all your educational and professional experiences. Your profile should change over time as your career does. Update your work and educational histories regularly when there’s a significant change in your professional or academic life. After adding your classmates to your network on LinkedIn, you can stay in touch with them and discuss career options with them long after your online course has ended. But be specific in your connection requests and personal messages rather than relying on LinkedIn’s default message, which demonstrates that you are unwilling to put in the effort to forge a genuine connection.

 

  1. Keep in touch

Creating a network of professionals is just the start. If you never communicate with any social media connections, having an extensive network isn’t much use. You must find ways to stay in touch with your contacts frequently if you want to benefit from your professional network fully. Maintaining contact with your connections enables you to create deeper connections.

 

Make time each month or every two months to get in touch with your contacts. Think about recommending a webinar on a related topic you found interesting or occasionally sharing an interesting article with a connection that brought them to mind. Or congratulate them if you see exciting news about their business published or if you notice that they recently started a new job or assumed more responsibility at their current employer. These little deeds can make a big difference in maintaining relationships. Moreover, staying in touch with your network contacts is critical if you’re actively looking for work or career advice.

 

 

You can help yourself and others by prioritizing relationship-building. Having a brief conversation or making a new acquaintance could be all it takes to land a new job or get the promotion you’ve been eyeing. But you won’t know unless you get out there and start connecting with people.

 

 

Like this article? There’s more from where this came! Check out our other interesting topics and what experts have to say on critical issues every student or working professional must understand. You can also look up our resources and guides on GRE, GMAT, Scholarships, Accreditation, and more for essential information. If you are interested in leadership and communication, read about the Masters in Organizational Leadership, Educational Leadership, Communication, English, Journalism, Linguistics, Creative Writing, Political Communication, Public Relations, or Strategic Communication.

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5 Reasons to Get a Graduate Certificate

OMC Admin

After receiving their bachelor’s degree, many want to continue their education, increase their knowledge in their field, advance their careers, or change careers. When applying for jobs or competing for promotions, some people want to stand out from the crowd. Continuing your education can develop valuable skills while making yourself stand out from other job applicants. You’re probably considering postgraduate education as the first step when considering this.

 

When they learn how difficult it is to obtain a master’s degree, some prospective students change their minds. Although obtaining a master’s degree can help you start down the path to a successful career, and there are many good reasons to get an advanced degree, not everyone should. Returning to graduate school can be a significant financial, time, and effort commitment. Fortunately, they have another choice if they ultimately decide against getting a master’s degree but still want to stand out from the competition: a Graduate Certificate – an excellent way to advance your career without spending a lot of time or money.

 

What Is a Graduate Certificate?

A graduate certificate is a condensed educational course of study designed to fill a gap in a professional’s education or advance a professional’s knowledge and abilities through specialized instruction. They are an academic form of specialized instruction.

 

Graduate certificates typically concentrate on a specific industry or job title, so those interested in obtaining one have a wide range of options. The ability to finish many graduate certificates entirely online gives you the freedom to continue your education while holding down a full-time job or taking care of family obligations.

 

Graduate Certificates vs. Master’s Degrees

You’ve come to the right place if you’re debating between a graduate certificate and a master’s degree. In a particular field of study, master’s degrees frequently require a full-time commitment and take about two years to complete because of the breadth of the coursework involved. Make sure you’re prepared to make the kind of commitment required when pursuing a master’s degree and evaluate your personal goals to determine which study option can help you achieve them if you’re trying to decide which path is best for you.

 

Additionally, a master’s degree frequently requires a much larger financial commitment than a graduate certificate. A master’s degree typically costs between $30,000 and $120,000 but varies depending on the program’s length, type, and university. On the other hand, a graduate certificate’s average tuition can range from $1,000 to $5,000, and many can be finished in a year.

 

The Benefits of Earning a Graduate Certificate

For professionals looking to further their education and improve their knowledge and abilities in a particular field or area, earning a graduate certificate has several appealing advantages. But if you’re asking yourself, “Is a graduate certificate worth it?” here are five benefits graduate certificates have to offer which may help you answer this question:

 

  1. An advantage over the competition

The job market is very cutthroat, and it often seems everyone is applying for the same job. Therefore, you must take every possible step to stand out from the competition when applying for jobs. A graduate certificate demonstrates to employers that you are invested in your field and can bring higher expertise to the workplace. Employers are constantly looking for unique qualities in candidates.

 

2 An increased pay & quick Return on Investment (ROI)

Salary must be brought up when discussing ROI. A master’s degree’s main selling point is frequently its higher starting salary. You’re lucky if your desire for higher pay is your primary driving force for considering earning a graduate certificate – a graduate certificate will typically result in a salary increase of between 13% and 25%. That’s a significant return on investment, especially given the speed at which you’ll finish the course. Moreover, an accredited graduate certificate can also significantly impact how appealing you are to employers. When you possess a certificate from an established, reputable institution, employers are more willing to pay you better.

 

If you’re going to invest time and money in higher education, you’ll want to ensure that you get something in return – known as return on investment (ROI). Unlike a master’s degree, which can take two or more years to complete, graduate certificate programs are typically completed within a year, allowing you to start earning more sooner.

 

  1. Added skills and job security

Beyond an undergraduate degree, further education is becoming more and more common. Upgrading your education can help you stand out in an increasingly competitive workforce as the job market changes. Employers are increasingly looking for candidates with some level of advanced education. Your industry knowledge will increase because a graduate certificate lets you keep your skills current. Graduate certificates, as opposed to learning broad, general information, focus on specific skills for a more specialized learning approach. This skill development will allow you to dive deeper into the subject, giving you a more in-depth understanding of the tools you’ll be working with, keeping you competitive. With a graduate certificate, you can demonstrate to employers that you have broadened your knowledge of the subject and are knowledgeable about current key concepts, skills, and tools.

 

Many employers frequently demand professional certifications, which graduate certificates can prepare you to fulfill. Graduate certificates offer required training and continuing education required for specific jobs or promotions and can ease the transition to managerial positions in some fields. You can use your newly acquired abilities to move into a leadership position, assume more responsibility, or test out an entirely different job.

 

  1. A Wider Professional Network

Like getting a degree, earning a graduate certificate puts you in touch with people you might not have met otherwise. These people, who can range from professors to advisors to fellow students, will become connections that will broaden your professional network, which could be helpful if you’re looking to apply for jobs or change careers.

 

  1. Preparation for a Graduate Degree

Professionals who pursue a graduate certificate do so to advance their careers as well as to begin the process of earning a master’s degree. A graduate certificate is held by about 51.9% of workers with advanced degrees because they are helpful in and of themselves and also serve as an easy steppingstone toward obtaining a graduate degree.

 

Graduate certificate programs are a significant first step if you’re unsure about what you’re interested in or aren’t ready to invest the time, money, and effort required for a master’s degree. You can start the full degree later if, after receiving your certificate and getting a sense of what learning in that field is like, you decide that you’d like to do so. By doing this, you can avoid enrolling in a degree program you are not sure is ideal for you.

 

Several graduate certificate programs are made to be stacked into a master’s degree, which is another crucial thing to keep in mind. The corresponding master’s degree has many requirements shared with the courses needed for a graduate certificate. As a result, after successfully completing the certificate program, universities frequently permit credits to be stacked and transferred to a master’s program. In other words, you’ll already have many credits you can apply to the degree—credits you won’t need to retake—should you decide to pursue a graduate degree later.

 

 

Should You Earn a Graduate Certificate?

Even though it might appear that getting a master’s degree is the only way to continue your education after undergrad, graduate certificates are crucial in assisting the labor force in meeting employer demands. A graduate certificate could be precisely what you need to update your skills, increase your salary, and gain a competitive edge—especially if you want to do this quickly.

 

 

Want to know about degrees, universities, careers, etc.? Check out what experts have to say, find answers to your questions, or dig into some resources that can help you make informed decisions.

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SMART Goals for Students

OMC Admin

Setting goals is crucial to getting ready to succeed in your academic and professional endeavors. Students in college can use goals to help them stay on track and meet deadlines.

 

SMART goals are a relatively new concept. George T. Doran, a consultant and former director of corporate planning for Washington Water Power Company, published “There’s a SMART Way to Write Management’s Goals and Objectives” in 1981. In this document, he introduced SMART goals as a tool for developing criteria to help improve the chances of achieving a goal. Soon, the SMART acronym became a popular goal-setting guideline.

 

This guide will explain SMART goals and provide tips for college students who want to create their own SMART goals.

 

 

Why is goal-setting important?

According to a study by the Dominican University of California, writing down your goals can increase your chances of success. The study points out that over four weeks, 76% of participants who were asked to write down their goals and share weekly progress with friends achieved their goals. In contrast, only 43% of participants who did not write down their goals achieved them.

 

 

What are SMART Goals?

SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. Your goal setting can be guided by using these criteria. Here is a quick run-down of each:

 

Specific: Your goal will be simpler to accomplish if it is more specific. Be clear in your goal setting as to what you hope to achieve. Clearly state your objectives, the deadline by which you’d like to achieve them, and the steps you must take. Although this isn’t a comprehensive list of steps you’ll take to accomplish a goal, it should address the following “w” questions: Who, What, When, Where, Which, Why.

 

Measurable: Your goal ought to be something that can be monitored and tracked. It may be challenging to determine how close you are to achieving your goal if it is too nebulous. Consider the metrics you will use to evaluate your progress toward the goal. Set some milestones by deciding on specific tasks to complete.

 

Attainable: As a college student, you may have your hands full and may have a lot to manage. This emphasizes the significance of a goal and what you can do to make it attainable, which may call for learning new skills and adopting new attitudes. Make sure your objective is something you can actually achieve in the allotted time.

 

Relevant: Focusing on something that aligns with your larger academic objectives is referred to as being relevant. Your SMART goals ought to be linked to advancement in your studies or careers. When setting a new goal, consider how achieving it will improve your academic standing or position you for future success in a particular field.

 

Time-bound: Anyone can set goals, but it’s unlikely they will be achieved if they aren’t realistically timed. When a goal is tied to a specific deadline, it is simpler to stay on track with it. Decide when you want to achieve your goal, and think about setting a target date for each step to help you achieve it. Specifying what should be accomplished halfway through the goal’s duration is helpful. A sense of urgency is also produced by setting deadlines.

 

 

How to measure your success in achieving SMART goals

The American Psychological Association (APA) states that keeping track of your progress can improve your chances of succeeding. Here are some of our best recommendations for college students who want to keep track of their SMART objectives.

 

  1. Let others know what your goal is

Many people discover that having a support system increases their motivation to accomplish their goals. Find a reliable person who can hold you accountable after you’ve set your goal. This could be a friend, a member of your family, a classmate, or a coworker.

 

  1. Create reminders

It is essential to regularly check in on your progress to keep your goal in focus. Add check-in reminders to your calendar for the duration of your goal. The length of your goal will affect how frequently you want to check-in. For instance, it may only be necessary to assess progress on a semester-long goal once a month, but if you wish to accomplish your goal more quickly, you may want to check in weekly or even more frequently.

 

  1. Record your progress

Monitoring becomes especially effective when you keep a written record of your progress toward your goal. Therefore, when you check in on your progress toward your goal, note it and list the subsequent actions you need to take. Documenting your progress can ensure that you complete your task.

 

  1. Modify deadlines as required

You might discover that you require more time than anticipated as you move closer to your goal. Don’t be afraid to change your goal if necessary if the original deadline you set seems to be out of reach. You might also think about breaking the goal into smaller, easier-to-achieve tasks, each with its specific due date.

 

 

Did you like this article and want to discover more such interesting reads? Then check out what experts have to say on various topics, find answers to your questions, or dig into some resources to help you make informed decisions.

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7 Public Health Careers for MPH Grads

OMC Admin

Although community medical clinics and awareness campaigns that encourage healthy living may come to mind when thinking of public health, these are only a tiny portion of the field. Instead, public health professionals are involved in all aspects of public life, from developing public policy to assisting refugees in integrating into new communities. The field requires creative leaders with a population health perspective who are aware of the challenges currently facing patients, practitioners, and policymakers and can use emerging technologies to address health disparities affecting local and global communities. There will never be a shortage of qualified public health professionals because most of the world has now personally experienced a public health crisis in the form of COVID-19. A master’s degree in public health may be the best route to take if you want to become one of those leaders.

 

What is the Master in Public Health?

A Online Masters in Public Health or MPH is a professional, graduate-level degree that teaches students how to effectively safeguard and enhance population health globally, with broad application in various fields and occupations. You will learn how to promote better health and wellness through education and research, focus on a wide range of public health issues, and work to improve the economic, social, and environmental health of communities.

 

Gaining an MPH will help you understand the problems affecting communities all over the world and how to address them through community partnerships, new public health policies, and services, research, or educational programming. A masters in public health teaches students how to measure and analyze the spread of diseases (epidemiology), manage healthcare services and plan healthcare, and critically consider social and cultural factors that impact health.

 

Benefits of Studying Public Health

In general, people who want to study public health are very motivated. Many people who are qualified for the job sincerely desire to make a significant difference in the lives of entire communities. Students can address some of the most critical threats to individual health and society at large by studying public health. Graduates with public health degrees, in particular, have many opportunities to work for different public health organizations and gain experience in the field, opening the door to potential solutions to these issues.

 

Because it can be challenging to define the field of public health, careers in it may be misunderstood. The provision of medical care outside a hospital setting and within a community is one aspect of public health. On the other hand, public health can refer to initiatives to stop epidemics, enhance the health of entire nations, and have global implications in different contexts.

 

Common Career Options for Masters in Public Health Graduates

You can take many routes when starting your public health career because many of them intersect with several other fields such as science, pharmaceuticals, business, law, and technology.

Listed here are 7 career options you could consider if you are in an MPH program or have just graduated from one:

 

  1. Epidemiologists

Median Annual Pay: $78,830

Estimated Job Growth, 2020 to 2030: 30% (much faster than average)

Typical Entry-Level Education: Master’s Degree

What they do: Epidemiologists are public health professionals investigating disease and injury patterns and causes. Through research, community education, and health policy, they try to reduce the risk and occurrence of adverse health outcomes and plan and direct studies on public health issues to find ways to prevent or treat them if they arise.

 

  1. Dieticians and Nutritionists

Median Annual Pay: $61,650

Estimated Job Growth, 2020 to 2030: 11% (faster than average)

Typical Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s Degree

What they do: Dietitians and nutritionists specialize in using food and nutrition to promote health and disease management. They advise clients on nutrition issues and healthy eating habits, as well as plan and implement food service or nutritional programs to assist people in living healthy lives.

 

  1. Medical and Health Services Managers

Median Annual Pay: $101,340

Estimated Job Growth, 2020 to 2030: 32% (much faster than average)

Typical Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s Degree

What they do: Medical and health services managers, also known as healthcare administrators or executives, organize, direct, and coordinate health and medical services. They oversee a health facility, specific clinical area, department, or doctor group’s medical practice. They improve the efficiency and quality of healthcare delivery while also ensuring that the facility they work in is up to date and complies with laws and regulations.

 

  1. Occupational Health and Safety Specialists and Technicians

Median Annual Pay: $74,870

Estimated Job Growth, 2020 to 2030: 7% (as fast as average)

Typical Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s Degree

What they do: Occupational health and safety specialists and technicians collect and analyze data on a wide range of work environments and procedures. While specialists inspect workplaces for compliance with safety, health, and environmental regulations, technicians collaborate with specialists to conduct tests and measure hazards to protect workers, property, the environment, and the general public.

 

  1. Registered Nurses

Median Annual Pay: $77,600

Estimated Job Growth, 2020 to 2030: 9% (as fast as average)

Typical Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s Degree

What they do: Registered Nurses (RNs) provide and coordinate patient care, educate patients and the general public about various health conditions, and counsel patients and their families. Nurses assess patients’ conditions, record their medical histories and symptoms, and administer their medicines and treatments.

 

  1. Social and Community Service Managers

Median Annual Pay: $74,000

Estimated Job Growth, 2020 to 2030: 15% (faster than average)

Typical Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s Degree

What they do: Managers of social and community services coordinate and supervise programs and organizations that promote public well-being. They supervise workers who provide these services to the public and collaborate with community members and other stakeholders to identify the required programs and services.

 

  1. Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors

Median Annual Pay: $48,520

Estimated Job Growth, 2020 to 2030: 23% (much faster than average)

Typical Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s Degree

What they do: Counselors for substance abuse, behavioral disorders, and mental health help people struggling with alcoholism, drug addiction, eating disorders, mental health issues, or other mental or behavioral issues. They provide treatment and support to clients to help them recover from addiction or modify problem behaviors.

 

 

Interested in public health? Advance your public health career as the field develops, and there is an increasing demand for professionals with the knowledge and expertise to address the complex issues affecting communities worldwide. Read our guide on the Masters in Public Health and Masters in Epidemiology. If you are interested in a related health field, consider the master’s degree program in Counseling, Applied Behavior, Art Therapy, Child Development, Clinical Research, Healthcare Administration, Marriage and Family Therapy, Nutrition, Occupational Health and Safety, and more.

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5 Essential Skills for HR Professionals

OMC Admin

If you are contemplating a Online Masters in Human Resources or working as an HR professional, you may want all the help you can get to be a successful HR manager and a popular one at that! Read on to find out what essential skills you require to take your HR career to the next level.

 

  1. Organization

If you work in HR, you are the central location for all employee data. One of the most essential skills for human resources is organization. Although many types of managers value organization, the interpersonal nature of HR frequently requires managers to approach each case with efficiency and planning. HR managers must make sure that employee information is well-organized and easily accessible. They also need to make sure that meetings are scheduled considering the obligations and work commitments of other managers or employees. Employees may react better to a practical and accessible HR department when dealing with issues like salary negotiations, benefits, or termination.

 

If you can, invest in quality HR software to make your life easier. It will keep track of all the information your team needs and remove the guesswork from deciding what you should keep and what you can throw away.

 

  1. Communication

In any position, having effective communication skills is a plus, but in human resources, they are essential. HR specialists can act as a point of contact for managers and employees. An HR professional should have excellent written and verbal communication skills, among other things, because it is his or her duty to communicate information to the company’s employees in an understandable manner. HR managers must feel at ease communicating clearly, effectively, and confidently, whether they send emails to potential employees, prepare a speech on employee safety, conduct an exit interview, or lead a new team training session.

 

The most potent communication tips are: (a) pay close attention as you speak, (b) write precisely and with clarity, and (c) communicate consistently.

 

  1. Discretion

Managers of human resources oversee maintaining the privacy of all current and former employees’ personal information. Everyone’s home address, medical background, and salary information are readily available to them. They are aware of who has the window office on the fast track and whose cubicle is closest to the entrance. Additionally, they have access to particularly private information about their workers, such as the findings of background checks and the specifics of wage garnishment judgments. It is crucial for HR professionals to keep information private and protected from anyone without the proper credentials because some of this information may be particularly sensitive. Personal information must be kept confidential and out of the public eye by HR managers.

 

Go further than what is already forbidden by law when sharing personal information improperly. Nothing in your words, tone, or body language should suggest that a worker might be experiencing a personal setback. Ensure your employees know you can be relied upon for anything. You’ll have an advantage in managing people thanks to your unwavering confidentiality.

 

 

  1. Negotiation Skills & Conflict Management

In the department, negotiations are commonplace for everything from salary increases to annual leave and contract extensions. It’s a never-ending back-and-forth. The capacity to negotiate a good deal for all parties concerned is critical. A good HR manager can use their patience, negotiation, and mediation skills to help others.

 

Another one of the key duties of HR professionals is handling grievances between employees and managers, or possibly between different employees. Conflict mediation, providing alternatives, and even declining requests are all part of effective people management. The secret to this, though, is how a professional handles such circumstances. In the workplace, HR managers are frequently asked to find solutions to issues, so they should be able to do so with maturity and respect for all parties. Understanding the other party, knowing when to concede some ground, and coming up with the best compromise for both parties are all characteristics of conflict management.

 

Ideally, conflict resolution will rank among your human resources competencies that are less frequently used but highly regarded.

 

  1. Relationship Building

Another crucial ability is the capacity for coordination and communication with others. Many new hires will get to know you for the first time, and many will see you off as they leave your company. Try to develop the kind of composure and patience that people need when they are under stress. Even if you can’t always give people what they want to hear, you can still provide them with a compassionate set of clear answers.

 

Effective team management decreases conflict, boosts employees’ faith in the organization, and generally improves the working environment. Software for conducting work climate surveys helps measure employee morale and gather insightful data on how to implement changes and improvements.

 

 

Hope these tips and insights make you a better HR professional than you already are!

 

 

Like this article? There’s more from where this came! Check out our other interesting topics and what experts have to say on critical issues every student or working professional must understand. You can also look up our resources and guides on GRE, GMAT, Scholarships, Accreditation, and more for essential information. If you are interested in human resources and related subjects, read about the Masters in Human Resources, Organizational Leadership, Educational Leadership, Communication, Political Communication, Public Relations, or Strategic Communication.

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